FYI 169AB “Learning to Serve” Summer 2020

FYI169ABFlyerSUM20Click HERE for the corse flyer (3MB)

Click HERE for the course SYLLABUS

WHY TAKE FYI 169AB this SUMMER? :

  • Course Delivery/Methods:
    • RELIABILITY: This course has been successfully taught for the previous FOUR summers, and your instructor has been able to update and adapt the content to best meet the needs of our busy students during those summer months.
    • FLEXIBILITY: students “check in” twice a week and complete the posted activities on their own, at their own pace. You will have space to work on, respond to, and contemplate the assignments and the projects that you build. You can predictably arrange your summer schedule around our course.
    • PACE: The eight-week format is manageable for most students. Most students can successfully complete all the assignments over the course of each week–about 16 hours on average. In comparison, a four-week course requires about 35 hours of work each week, and generally must meet each day.
    • Enrollment size: is typically small, so you will have more one-on-one help from your instructor. The service group/community typically becomes quite close over the course of the semester.
    • PROJECT-BASED LEARNING: You can work individually (or collaborate if you wish) on projects that YOU build that address your interests–and which will make a big impact on your community. You truly can “learn” while serving. You have a lot of flexibility, therefore, in what you spend your summer hours working on.
      • THIS SUMMER YOU WILL BE ENCOURAGED TO THINK OF PROJECTS THAT RELATE TO OUR CURRENT HEALTH-CRISIS! (don’t feel helpless by Covid-19–work to beat it!)
        • (There will be alternatives for those of you not interested or unable to work in this area. Students have been completing successful summer projects for many years now!)
        • ALL OF OUR PROJECTS WILL ADHERE TO SAFE SOCIAL DISTANCING GUIDELINES AND THE HEALTH DIRECTIVES THAT APPLY TO THE COMMUNITY YOU ARE WORKING WITH. (Including lots of completely-online or at home options).
  • READINGS
    • In addition to selections from our work book, we will work with readings (and multimedia resources) that are current in the news or relevant to the region.
    • WE will also read and discuss as a class two books that outline inspirational stories of people helping people (with both the positive and the negative parts of those experiences) and which offer suggestions for how you can similarly spend your life making a difference!
      • We will read and discuss selections that relate to the current health crisis. Hopefully these will inspire you and make you feel less helpless in the face of this pandemic.
  • ASSIGNMENTS:
    • We use our Service Learning workbook to set up a clear PROPOSAL for our project (with lots of feedback from your instructor) and then you prepare for your service work (following the guidelines in our book) and complete your service project on your own and then REPORT to the rest of the class your service experience at the end of the course!
    • In our first weeks together we will brainstorm potential projects, especially those that might address this current health crisis. A good starting point might be to replicate (and sustain more fully) some of the types of service projects that were completed recently by CSC Students for the “Virtual Big Event.” Here is a news release with some details:
    • HERE ARE EXAMPLES OF PREVIOUS SUMMER PROJECTS IN OUR COURSE:
      • Mentoring youth & addressing gang violence (Chattanooga, TN)
      • Food Trucks to fight community hunger (Spearfish, SD)
      • Saving the Frontier County Fair, Maintenance & Service (Stockville, NE)
      • “QPR” Training at Community Business for Suicide Prevention (Cheyenne, WY)
      • Adult Education Volunteer for Western Nebraska Community College (Scottsbluff, NE)
      • Fostering interest in STEM education by mentoring High School Students through an Amateur Radio (HAM) Club (Lincoln, NE).
      • Fundraising and publicity  for the Working Ranch Cowboy Association (WRCA) at Fairs and Rodeos (Las Animas, CO)
      • Food drive and addressing hunger in Broadwater and Bridgeport, Nebraska
      • Homeless Shelter/Rescue Mission volunteer work (Fort Wayne, IA)
      • Engagement and involvement for isolated elderly patients in a care center/nursing home (Torrington, WY)
      • Community project supporting awareness and treatment for HIV/AIDS (Maputo, Mozambique)
      • Promoting healthy relationships and combatting dating violence and abuse among teens (Alliance, NE–Panhandle Doves Program, Western Nebraska)
      • Technology education for adult learners (Hershey, NE)
      • Mentoring college track athletes to transition into careers after school & sports (Cleremont, FL)
      • Community outreach and awareness  for the Panhandle Humane Society, and service to the animal shelter  (Scottsbluff, NE)
      • Preschool, education and behavioral skills training for at home day care (Rapid City, SD)
      • Refurbishment, publicity and fundraising for the North Platte Community Playhouse & Fox Theater (North Platte, NE)
      • Marketing, advertising and care and fostering of animals for the Humane Society of the Black Hills (Rapid City, SD)
      • Volunteer work with Community Medical Services, a clinic addressing addiction issues and the opioid crisis (Phoenix, AZ)
      • Summer maintenance and volunteer work for Head Start and the Northwest Community Action Partnership (Alliance, NE)
      • Updating and improving the website and promotion of the Sandhills Area Foundation (Cherry County, NE)
      • Summer food insecurity/”backpack” program for hungry students and their families (Alliance, NE)
      • Community clean-up and litter control along walking trails  (Grand Rapids, MI)
      • Combatting food insecurity and food deserts in densely-populated urban community by establishing a food bank and community garden (San Francisco, CA)
      • Wildlife protection, roads cleanup and other projects for youth community service (Clarks, NE)
      • Youth mentorship for at-risk and impoverished youth through the Gretna Soccer Club (Gretna, NE) and “Completely KIDS” (Omaha, NE)
      • Working with “Needs Inc.” to address poverty and homelessness (Torrington, WY)
      • Healthy lifestyles volunteer work focusing on fitness and nutrition (Glenrock, WY and Chadron, NE)
      • Volunteer work for the “Haven of Hope” food bank and homeless shelter (San Antonio, TX).
      • Food bank, food insecurity and community relations with law enforcement in a low-income housing development (the “McDougald Food Project in Durham, NC)
      • Keeping Lincoln County and North Platte beautiful–summer cleanup project (North Platte, NE)
      • 4-H Rodeo Volunteer and Judging (Wall, SD)

FOR MORE INFO:

    • Dr.  Matthew Evertson
    • Department of English & Humanities
    • Chadron State College
    • (308) 432-6462 mevertson@csc.edu