About Me (Curriculum Vita and More)

Matthew Evertson

English & Humanities
Professor

Contact Information

Phone: 308-432-6462
Office: Old Admin 206
E-mail: mevertson@csc.edu

Education/Background

Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona
Ph.D., English, with a concentration in American literature, May 2003

University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska
M.A., English: December, 1993
B.A., English (with high distinction): May, 1991

Teaching Areas

American Literature & American Realism & Naturalism;
Western American Literature & Literature of the Great Plains;
Literature of the Environment;
Native American Literature;
First Year Experience/General Education;
Writing

Campus Involvement

  • Mari Sandoz Heritage Society Board of Directors
  • Story Catcher Summer Writing Workshop
  • Sigma Tau Delta English Honorary
  • Exploratory Committee on American Indian Recognition and Reconciliation (Land Acknowledgement and Beyond) at Chadron State College

Professional Activities and Awards

  • Western Literature Association
  • Association for the Study of Literature and Environment (ASLE)
  • Willa Cather Foundation
  • American Literature Association (ALA)
  • Association of Writers and Writing Programs (AWP)
  • Modern Language Association (MLA)
  • The Stephen Crane Society
  • Friends of the Center for Great Plain Study
  • Phi Beta Kappa

Research Interests and Published Works

I am currently teaching, researching and writing about the regional influences upon the literature of the Great Plains, with a special emphasis on the Environmental Humanities. I’m also interested in the role of liberal arts in higher education and interdisciplinary/integrative learning across the curriculum. My earlier scholarship focused on American literary naturalism and a comparative study of Stephen Crane and Theodore Roosevelt. Since returning to Nebraska to teach, my interests have evolved into the ecocritical explorations of Western American writers, particularly those voices of our region in the Great Plains. My current writing projects include an exploration of the ecological themes surrounding “home” and “homes” in the works of Willa Cather, Mari Sandoz, Wright Morris and other Nebraska voices. In my spare time I attempt to write long and short fiction, mostly set in the contemporary West.

My publications include “Fields of Vision: Human Presence in the Plain Landscapes of Terrence Malick and Wright Morris” which appears in Terrence Malick Film and Philosophy (New York: Continuum, 2011); “Cather in the Rye: ‘Paul’s Case’ in Anticipation of Holden Caulfield” in Critical Insights: The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger (New York: EBSCO/Salem Press, 2011); “Holden Caulfield’s Longing to Construct a New Home” which appears in Bloom’s Guides: J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye. Ed. and Intro by Harold Bloom (2007); “The Call of the Critics: Jack London, The Call of the Wild, and its Early Reviews” which appears this spring in The Call: The Magazine of the Jack London Society; “Strenuous Stories: The Wilderness Tales of Stephen Crane and Theodore Roosevelt” which appears in Stephen Crane Studies (2005); “Stephen Crane and ‘Some Others’: Economics, Race and the Vision of a Failed Frontier” which appears in Moving Stories: Migration and The American West, 1850-2000 (University of Nevada Press, 2001) and “Love, Loss and Growing Up in J.D. Salinger and Cormac McCarthy” which appears in The Catcher in the Rye: New Essays (Peter Lang, 2002).